Philippines

The Philippines

Lovely people, lousy food and loads of churches

3rd November to 5th December

With Jenny as crew we left Halmahera (a big Indonesian island) for a four day sail to north Mindanao (yet another big island, this one in the Philippines).

IMG_E2593Then followed a busy month that took us through about twenty different anchorages on a dozen of Philippines’ 7,000 odd islands. Just a taster of a giant country. (But then most of this voyage has been a series of tasters – a mere glimpse at a scattering of the world’s lesser travelled outposts.)

I knew nothing of the Philippines, and right now still know next to nothing, so take anything I say with heaps of salt. I did know that Ferdinand Magellan was the first European to visit. He was killed here too.

IMG_2564
Village named after Magellan
P1020812
Limasawa, site of the first Christian service in the islands, Easter 1521

P1020804P1020806P1020807P1020808

That was in 1521. The islands were named by a Spaniard a few years later in honour of King Philip II of Spain. Spain then retained it as part of its Empire for over 300 years, before selling it to America who kept it, apart from the troubled invasion of Japanese in WWII, till 1946.

IMG_2558
This is Wendell, a pastor from Winnipeg, Canada (which I gather has a large Filippino community) visiting his home island, Limasawa. He seemed to think the Pope might come here to celebrate the 500th Anniverary of Chritianity’s arrival! You heard it first here….

There are now over 100 million Filipinos in the country, with some 19 accepted languages and ten ethnic groups, and at least 10 million more who live and work overseas (and provide a huge chunk of foreign earnings for the nation). IMG_2570

I found people to be universally delightful; laid-back yet quietly industrious, and compared to others in SE Asia, reserved, even shy – though not shy enough to cease some painfully discordant karaoke singing!

The selfie culture that’s become a plague elsewhere, seems absent in the Philippines. (Though keep in mind that I only saw a part of the country.)

IMG_2553
Inquisitive young folk often want to visit Henrietta

Most of the islands seem unvisited by tourists. Tourists appeared, predominantly Korean and Chinese en masse on the little island of Boracay, where around 2 million visitors go each year, dwarfing the local population of 30,000; and there are also many foreigners who go to the big island of Palawan. Everywhere else seemed very traditional with small communities making a living with fishing, copra and small scale agriculture.IMG_2537IMG_2554

IMG_2516
Almost every beach is crowded with these fishing bangka, elegant colourful ‘spider’ boats 

Boracay is a gem of an island (white sand, clear seas, hills), but was deemed so polluted in 2018, that the President had it closed for six months! Sewage systems were improved and plastic cleared up, and I’m happy to say it seemed spotless, safe and a delight – though anchorage decidedly exciting, rolly and deafening as tripper boats and sailing prahas and bangka roared and growled past.P1020855

P1020864
Boracay. Fine white sandy beaches and fleets of prahas

If like me you are vegetarian or veggie-inclined the food is a disaster. Apart from a few pleasing exceptions in tourist places, it appears that pig, chicken, fish and cow plus lashings of oil and dollops of sugar are key ingredients of most dishes.

 

P1020883

One consequence is a plethora of health clinics (diabetes a common ailment), beauty parlours, fitness and massage dives. P1020824

P1020835
Wide choice of rice, market on Cebu
P1020838
An appreciation of flowers in homes and gardens and for sale here in the market
P1020784
The ubiquitous ‘tricycle’, the taxi for everyone everywhere

I could  go further and say, at risk of hurting American feelings, that the Philippines displays the worst of American culture (poor food, soulless shopping malls, donuts and fast food, rubbish telly, polluted city streets) without the privileges of American choice and wealth. 

And another thing that it shares with America: loads of churches, chapels, cathedrals, Adventist, Evangelist, Catholic, Baptist, Methodist, plus some whacky ones….I don’t know what it all means but you can walk down a little street in Limasawa (a small island where the first Philippine Christian service was held nearly 500 years ago) and see at least half a dozen different places to pray, in less than a mile. The singing sounded beautiful – much better than any karaoke.

P1020891
Grand cathedral (Puerto Princesa) looks down on the impoverished. ’twas ever thus.

My sailing plan had been straightforward. I like things simple. I’d go north from Indonesia to the Philippines with last of the SE Monsoon, then south back back down to Borneo with the start of the NE Monsoon. That’s more-or-less what happened. It’s just that weather doesn’t follow a precise calendar, and round these parts there are typhoons that whistle in from the Pacific so you keep an eye on where they are. (A typhoon is the local name for hurricane and cyclone)

IMG_2576
We watch the approach of tyhoons (two crossed to the north in the month). They disturb the weather over a much wider area.

But overall, it has been good to have sails set most of the way…..and enough heavy rain showers to keep water tanks topped up.P1020819

Jenny joined another boat in the Philippines (thank you Jenny for sharing all those watches and some memorably delicious cooking). I sailed on single-handed again and arrived back in Kota Kinabalu, North Borneo, a couple of days ago (Last here in July). 

About 1,500 miles in the month and I’m weary as I work through that interminable list of boaty chores, and catch up with personal stuff. Christmas is never far away. (Nor another UK election – but I shan’t offer an opinion!)

P1020902
It’s big and extraordinary. Puerto Princesa, Palawan

5 thoughts on “Philippines”

  1. Thank you for your most educational post on the Philippines. Amongst other things I have learnt that I should probably take a look there myself one day and that it is spelt with one ‘l’ and three ‘p’s. Happy Christmas. We still look forward to your arrival in Sydney while realizing that it may never happen.

    Like

  2. As ever – Micheal the wanderer … & bringer of Pope’s future movements!
    The monsoons sound as if they make for interesting passage planning …?
    We, (ie Martin, me & Sandpiper) are currently at anchor off Anfi on south coast of Gran Canaria, provisioned & ready to embark for Cape Verde islands this w/e, when a decent weather window is forecast forour proposed 6-7 day crossing. I don’t recall if you visited Cap Verde or you crossed from Canaries…?
    Well M – wheresoe’r you find y’self I wish you all the best for Christmas & hope you procure a delicious nut roast loaf for Xmas dinner. Festive greetings from Stephanie Connor

    Like

  3. Hi Michael How are you? Hope the wind has been kind to you Greetings from a cold well freezing New Zealand It has been raining hard so the waterfalls are amazing. Been cycling and walking the trails some a little hilly! But not climbing any volcanos Now heading towards Steward Island I do enjoy reading your blogs so please keep them coming Hope you all have a great Christmas and lots of fun in 2020 Fair winds Joycie

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s